I don’t use any pain meds, as I didn’t find them very helpful, FOR ME, I can’t speak for others.I found that just finding exercise while not relieving pain.

But all the while I was seeing this medical practice twice a week for pain, I was still seeing my own GP for the medications and other treatments required. I spoke of how I grew up.Medicinally, where my mother grew up, in Slovenia…there were NO DOCTORS so if she had criteria….well, it worked, cause I’m alive.If when, it appeared we needed more than she could herbally offer, my parents then would take us to a doctor. Maybe you didn’t read my quote.”Pitta imbalances” was the specific “ailment” referenced.

Mahalo for your clarification.. *S* One of them faffed about using ‘traditional’ stimulus points (but was pretty quick regardless), the other just asked what the problem was, zapped a few times, checked if the pain was gone, couple of extra zaps for the remaining weak/painful muscles and I was out the door. I am not familiar, nor do I know that is is available. *S* Thank you for your kindness however and suggestion. I’m not an MD or a Ayurvedic doc by any means, but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances–i.e.

signs of inflammation and heat in the body. I have also used “acupuncture” extensively – but not really. Originally Posted by patricius79 Originally Posted by babe Originally Posted by adelady I think it is best to take the best of both worlds, “Science” and mother nature’s Science….and balance them.

I think I read somewhere that the amla-based jam–Chywanaprash–is used for the general imbalances associated with glaucoma. They told us that, flat out.I was in a major car wreck in 2000 and have injuries from my knees to my ears. Originally Posted by patricius79 You’re in my prayers, Babe. But there’s also epidemiological research which has a pretty solid reputation.

Though they would have to catch me and trap me in the car…I hated doctors at an early age.I think I went 3 times and only for shots.Mom seemed to cure us quite well.I am not demeaning the medical community, but i totally challenge my doctors… and question them and if I don’t agree with them I won’t take their advice.Doctors are not “gods”.They are wonderful in many ways, but they aren’t always right. No needles, no waiting around, in and out in less than 15 minutes. Their treatment for my nephew is what killed him, not the cancer. Ayurvedic doctors claim that amla fruit is very good for the eyes.

I don’t use any pain meds, as I didn’t find them very helpful, FOR ME, I can’t speak for others.I found that just finding exercise while not relieving pain. is helping deal with the injuries.I do not disrespect medicine. No needles, no waiting around, in and out in less than 15 minutes. Also, I’m looking for actual scientific evidence for statins. Maybe you didn’t read my quote.”Pitta imbalances” was the specific “ailment” referenced.

They told us that, flat out.I was in a major car wreck in 2000 and have injuries from my knees to my ears. But all of us who might be interested in a particular disease or treatment or medication have a problem. Triphala also is made of 30% Amla and is extremely beneficial for many people and very balanced and harmless and antioxidant. What do YOU think is the best alternative to the use of objective data?

The process involved no needles and most doctors and physical therapists consider it not to be acupuncture at all. I’m not an MD or a Ayurvedic doc by any means, but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances–i.e. signs of inflammation and heat in the body. I think I read somewhere that the amla-based jam–Chywanaprash–is cheap+custom+essay+papers
used for the general imbalances associated with glaucoma. Instead of needles, the doctors involved used lasers. Do we dress ourselves, use the computer, or cook based on the scientific method or a looser and more human form of reasoning, or intuition, or experimentation?

As to the idea that the honest application of the scientific method is the ONLY objective, or the MOST objective way of knowing–this has not been shown using the scientific method. Ayurvedic doctors claim that amla fruit is very good for the eyes. What do you think of this meta-analysis which found this: The overall contribution of curative and adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survival in adults was estimated to be 2.3% in Australia and 2.1% in the USA.The contribution of cytotoxic che… [Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol).

2004] – PubMed – NCBI Originally Posted by babe Originally Posted by Dywyddyr Originally Posted by patricius79 but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances What an excellent idea!Suggest an unproven remedy for a nonsensical “ailment”.Bound to work. The survival rate for being resuscitated from unconscious with his particular kind of heart attack is 40% – outcomes are even worse for a more conventional heart attack/unconscious/resuscitate case. I have advanced glaucoma due to the trauma of my car accident, and the road ahead is not looking too bright.

I think I read somewhere that the amla-based jam–Chywanaprash–is used for the general imbalances associated with glaucoma. Did I misunderstand you? Glaucoma is a “nonsensical ailment”? I think perhaps I did. IN other words, applying statistics to a particular person.

Originally Posted by patricius79 Would you guys agree with this post? I’m still looking for a serious analysis of that chemo study–”meta-analysis” I believe–which found that chemo is not very effective. You’re in my prayers, Babe. One of them faffed about using ‘traditional’ stimulus points (but was pretty quick regardless), the other just asked what the problem was, zapped a few times, checked if the pain was gone, couple of extra zaps for the remaining weak/painful muscles and I was out the door. So it’s never published in the first place.”Medical” research is a very broad field, the sort of problem Ioannidis was concerned about was mainly in the pharma area.

Strange mentioned above the reasoning required to pull up one’s pants and use a computer. I have also used “acupuncture” extensively – but not really. Also, it looks to me like things like statins are simply not scientific.

Originally Posted by patricius79 but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances What an excellent idea!Suggest an unproven remedy for a nonsensical “ailment”.Bound to work. That’s what I mean when I say that the idea of practicing medicine based on statistics is not a scientific idea. I spoke of how I grew up.Medicinally, where my mother grew up, in Slovenia…there were NO DOCTORS so if she had criteria….well, it worked, cause I’m alive.If when, it appeared we needed more than she could herbally offer, my parents then would take us https://studenthub.uq.edu.au/ to a doctor. Triphala also is made of 30% Amla and is extremely beneficial for many people and very balanced and harmless and antioxidant.

I’m very ignorant and could use help understanding things. Though they would have to catch me and trap me in the car…I hated doctors at an early age.I think I went 3 times and only for shots.Mom seemed to cure us quite well.I am not demeaning the medical community, but i totally challenge my doctors… and question them and if I don’t agree with them I won’t take their advice.Doctors are not “gods”.They are wonderful in many ways, but they aren’t always right. But I use that knowledge to inform and question doctors, not to ignore or override them in favour of other processes.

I’m not an MD or a Ayurvedic doc by any means, but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances–i.e. signs of inflammation and heat in the body. I do agree that within the broader field of reasoning and empiricism that statistics and the scientific method have a very serious place. I don’t use any pain meds, as I didn’t find them very helpful, FOR ME, I can’t speak for others.I found that just finding exercise while not relieving pain. is helping deal with the injuries.I do not disrespect medicine.

Instead of needles, the doctors involved used lasers. Did I misunderstand you? Glaucoma is a “nonsensical ailment”? I think perhaps I did. But I use that knowledge to inform and question doctors, not to ignore or override them in favour of other processes.

But all the while I was seeing this medical practice twice a week for pain, I was still seeing my own GP for the medications and other treatments required. Originally Posted by patricius79 That’s what I mean when I say that the idea of practicing medicine based on statistics is not a scientific idea. My doctors will tell you that I question them if I am not good with something but in the end…..hopefully research and science will find a new step before my luck runs out…. I know it is very powerful as an antioxidant–loaded with quality vitamin C, etc.

And According to this study, Crestor is associated with a 25% increased risk of diabetes mellitus: Conversely, rosuvastatin 20 mg/day was numerically associated with 25% increased risk for DM compared with placebo Meta-analysis of impact of different types and … [Am J Cardiol. 2013] – PubMed – NCBI Research always comes up with 40/60, 85/15, type results, but that’s not how it works for the individual. (My husband being a classic case. But the result for him is simple, either 100% alive or 100% dead.) . I have advanced glaucoma due to the trauma of my car accident, and the road ahead is not looking too bright. I know it is very powerful as an antioxidant–loaded with quality vitamin C, etc. Originally Posted by adelady The biggest problem is with “unsuccessful” research that hasn’t produced the results a project was aiming for – but might give good guidance to others in a related (or even an unrelated) field.

My doctors will tell you that I question them if I am not good with something but in the end…..hopefully research and science will find a new step before my luck runs out…. What do YOU think is the best alternative to the use of objective data? Their treatment for my nephew is what killed him, not the cancer. And what criteria do you use to distinguish the risks and benefits of the two approaches? Do you have the medical training necessary to determine in advance whether a certain symptom or condition will become more dangerous or damaging if you defer medical approaches in favour of “mother nature’s” science?

As it happens, I know quite a lot more about the conditions that I suffer from than many doctors who don’t specialise in those areas – let alone my personal combination of conditions and symptoms. I know it is very powerful as an antioxidant–loaded with quality vitamin C, etc. Originally Posted by Dywyddyr Originally Posted by babe Originally Posted by Dywyddyr Originally Posted by patricius79 but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances What an excellent idea!Suggest an unproven remedy for a nonsensical “ailment”.Bound to work. Did I misunderstand you? Glaucoma is a “nonsensical ailment”?

I think perhaps I did. Also, it looks to me like things like statins are simply not scientific. You’re in my prayers, Babe. The process involved no needles and most doctors and physical therapists consider it not to be acupuncture at all. Ayurvedic doctors claim that amla fruit is very good for the eyes.

Triphala also is made of 30% Amla and is extremely beneficial for many people and very balanced and harmless and antioxidant. IN other words, applying statistics to a particular person. Originally Posted by Dywyddyr Originally Posted by patricius79 but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances What an excellent idea!Suggest an unproven remedy for a nonsensical “ailment”.Bound to work. Originally Posted by Dywyddyr Originally Posted by patricius79 but I would think they would suggest Amla especially for Pitta imbalances What an excellent idea!Suggest an unproven remedy for a nonsensical “ailment”.Bound to work.

From my perspective, the scientific method was largely the fruit of monotheistic culture–especially Catholic culture in the West, which recognized supernatural revelation and the broader field of reasoning.

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